Posted on

The Not-So-Common, Common Cold

The “Not-So-Common” Common Cold

Common Colds Shouldn’t be so Common

A recent Wall Street Journal article (March 24, 2014) talked about the common cold.  It stated that the average adult has 2 to 5 colds per year while school children may have up to 7 to 10 colds per year.  It also stated that the average cold lasts 18 days.  And conventional doctors say zinc, echinacea or vitamin C are not the answers–the evidence is not conclusive that any of them help.

Dr. Gardner’s comments:  Although I recognize 2 to 5 colds a year is ‘average,’ having any more than 0 or 1 cold a year is not healthy.  ‘Average’ people do not have healthy immune systems. 

So: How do you build the immune system?

  1. Get off sugar and processed food, which suppress the immune system!
  2. Get proper nutrients—eat real food and high-quality supplements.
  3. Reduce stress—poor sleep, emotional stuff, finances, relationships.
  4. Exercise releases redox signaling molecules which help fight all infections.
  5. There are supplements that specifically build the killer T cells and support the immune system.
  6. And yes, zinc, echinacea, and vitamin C all can benefit our health.

When you get a cold, what should you do?

  1. Get rest, especially if sleep-deprivation is the cause of the stress.
  2. Oil of Oregano has the strongest anti-viral properties of all the essential oils.
  3. High dose vitamin C, 6 grams per day, as it takes that much to replace the vitamin C depletion in the white cells during a viral infection.
  4. Drink plenty of fluids to flush out toxins released as part of the infection.

To your dynamic health and energy,

Stan Gardner, MD, CNS

Posted on

Sugar: Not So Sweet!

One of the problems with regulating sugar consumption is being able to identify the foods that contain it. It’s not always obvious.  Many foods, however, do contain sugar.  For example, you maybe surprised to learn that: 1. Many meat packers feed sugar to animals prior to slaughter.  This improves the flavor and color of cured meat. 2. Sugar (in the form of corn syrup and dehydrated molasses) is often added to hamburgers sold in restaurants to reduce shrinkage. 3. The breading on many prepared foods contains sugar. 4. Before salmon is canned, it is often glazed with a sugar solution. 5. Some fast-food restaurants sell poultry that has been injected with a flavorful honey solution.

Lick the Sugar Habit

Nancy Appleton, PhD

My comments: Sugar is a toxin.  A toxin is any substance that interferes with the normal metabolism of the body.  As we explore Dr. Appleton’s book, the damaging effects of this substance (or substances) will be amply obvious.  If you or your loved ones have found yourself addicted to sugar and need help, please sign up on the interest list for my groundbreaking and amazingly successful program, Sweet Freedom from Sugar.  Just go to www.sweetfreedomforme.com and you will get word as soon as it is ready to launch.

Posted on

Type II Diabetes

A reader writes: I am a type II diabetic. I have had everything under control for five years and
all of a sudden I have gained 35 lbs. I eat ice cream and chocolate in huge
amounts daily. Sugar cravings. I just do not understand. My A1C has been 5-6
and now it is over 7. Help!

My response: You have already identified your problem–sugar intake raises blood sugar and insulin. Your insulin resistance is worse since starting this sugar binge. Insulin blocks your body’s ability to break down fat and utilize fat for energy, and it causes the body to convert glucose into fat for storage. Your fasting glucose levels have probably risen from 90 to 110 before to the present levels of 130 to 160, while your fasting insulin is probably in the teens or 20s (the ideal should be 5 or below). Treatment starts with stopping sugar intake, and reducing all carbohydrate intake to 60 to 100 grams per day. We have available a Sweet Freedom From Sugar program that has helped others get over their sugar addictions and cravings. Let us know if you are interested and we will put you on the interest list.